Archive for the ‘Notes’ Category

Windows 10: Disappearing mouse cursor…

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

windows 10

Mouse cursor disappears after you’ve logged in? Try this:

Change the registry key ‘EnableCursorSuppression’ to ‘0’.

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System\EnableCursorSuppression=0

Need assistance? Reach out, and we can schedule a remote session to take care of the issue.

Solution worked for you like it has for me? You can say thanks via PayPal here!



Be Critical of Claims…

Tuesday, April 19th, 2011

Looking for a good, qualified, professional IT services company shouldn’t be as difficult as it is.

Some have argued recently that regulation by the state, like they do with contractors, would help this. I disagree, for a myriad of reasons. But that is for another post.

I would venture to say that one way is to simply be more critical of the claims of a company. For example:

Do they claim to be a “leading” company? If so, by what criteria?

Do they claim to be vendor-neutral? If so, is that reflected in their partnerships with certain hardware or software manufacturers? Vendor neutrality is extremely rare–we all have preferences based on situation, support options, etc.

Do they make a particularly major point about the age of the company or date it was established? Does that ignore ownership changes or employee turnover, both of which can be far more of an indicator of the true stability of the company?

Are they a one-size-fits-all company? One of the major trends on IT in recent years is that of managed services, and there are some very valid reasons for it. But is it the right fit for every client? Absolutely not.

IT Service Works is here as a resource, whether that be to consult and support your company, supplement your current IT support, or to provide an accurate, unbiased analysis of your current support and issues. Feel free to contact with any questions!

Business Examiner Article!

Friday, January 2nd, 2009

I was featured in the Dec 2008 edition of the Business Examiner! Text below:

Executive SPOTLIGHT

Editor’s Note: Executive Spotlight is a profile of an individual, business or local industry here in the South Sound. The feature will appear in the print edition of the Business Examiner as well as its online sibling; the BE Daily. Candidates from this feature are chosen from print and BE Daily subscriber lists. To subscribe, visit www.BusinessExaminer.com.

New small business owner ready to provide support
After 12 years working as an information technology consultant for several South Sound companies, Scott Kuhn took his own one-man IT support firm full time just last month.

Kuhn’s firm, IT Service Works, is based in Tacoma, though he works on-site for companies across the state and beyond. A Navy veteran, Kuhn got a degree in Church Ministries before focusing on the rapidly growing local technology sector.

He does wish he had taken more of an interest in the bookkeeping side of business ownership earlier in his career. “I’ve always been adverse to the back-office financial aspect,” Kuhn said. “I wanted to take care of the client and fix the issues, not generate invoices and manage billing. That being said, I now find myself having to.”

Kuhn said supporting local IT needs isn’t what he dreamed of doing with his life, but he understands his attraction to it. “It isn’t too much of a shock” he said. “I get to have the balance between technical issues and dealing with people that I’ve enjoyed for years.”

Kuhn advises others interested in a career in the technology sector to understand that most issues aren’t purely technical. “Have people skills,” he said. “Have patience. Have more patience.”

Kuhn said he chose to work with small businesses because of the economy. “When times are tough, the companies hardest hit are the larger ones:’ he said. “Small business owners, by and large, keep going because they have to. Just like me, they’ve got families to feed.”

Kuhn said, if he could do anything over, he would’ve taken the daunting leap into small business ownership earlier in his career. “I would have gone out on my own sooner, despite the risk and uncertainty,” he said.

Ping an IP Address Range

Saturday, October 11th, 2008

From commandline:

for /L %z in (1,1,254) do @ping 10.0.0.%z -w 10 -n 1 | find “Reply”

Change the “10.0.0.” to appropriate local network.

Did the info help? You can say thanks via PayPal here!

Font Smoothing in Ubuntu (or derivative)

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

The default fonts on my Mint were driving me crazy at this resolution (1280×1024), and options for the kind of font smoothing that XP and Vista have weren’t readily apparent. But thanks to the knowledgebase that is the Internet (yeah, I’m sure it’s also in some man pages in Mint as well) here’s how to enable:

From Terminal, type:

sudo gedit ~/.fonts.conf

(or even better, copy and paste into Terminal!)

Likely is blank. Copy this into it:

<fontconfig>
<match target=”font”>
<edit name=”autohint” mode=”assign”>
<bool>true</bool>
</edit>
</match>
</fontconfig>
Save, Log off/in…done.

Install Microsoft TrueType Fonts in Ubuntu (Or Derivative)

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

So I’d grown accustomed to the default fonts in Mint, and hadn’t had any issues since the font smoothing. But today I decided to install the Windows TrueType fonts….and wow, what a difference!

It’s not so much the fonts themselves, just that nearly everything online and off is built using them. So websites look different–heck, my blog even looks different.

So here’s how:
From Terminal, type: sudo apt-get install msttcorefonts
Enter sudo password and off you go.

Update the cache by then typing:
sudo fc-cache -fv

 

Did the info help? You can say thanks via PayPal here!

Mount Windows Shares in Ubuntu (or derivative)

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

1. edit your /etc/hosts file; give the Windows machine an associated name (or to be consistent with Windows networking, the machine’s Netbios name)
2. install the samba and smbfs packages (sudo apt-get install samba/smbfs)
3. Create a directory for the share to appear locally (sudo mkdir /mnt/bob, for instance)
4. Edit /etc/fstab for the share (example of //systemname/sharename /mnt/bob cifs exec,credentials=/etc/cifspw 0 0)
5. Since you just referred it to a password file, create that (in /etc/cifspw for the credentials of the share, as in:
username=Bob
password=BobHasNoPassword)
6. Secure it, if you want (sudo chmod 600 /etc/cifspw)
7. Mount it up: sudo mount -a
8. Create shortcuts/links as you will (the mount is in the location you specified in step 3)

Keeping home directory on separate partition

Sunday, August 24th, 2008

Ubuntu’s done some phenomenal work the past few years helping move Linux mainstream. One of the things they haven’t done–and they are not alone–is emphasize creating and using a separate partition mounted as /home.

Why is that important? Well, take me, for example. Reformatted my laptop a couple days ago, and after running into an issue configuring a VM, I started over yet again. Did I need to back up, reconfigure everything (as if I was in Windows)? Nope. Matter of fact, the /home directory contains a lot of configuration info, your Docs and Pictures…so I booted up after the install, and even Evolution was already set up and waiting for me to read my email. No configuration needed. Desktop wallpaper, configurations I’d done to the Gnome panel, everything was there. As it should be, I might add…

So, Canonical…please consider it as a standard like you do with the swap partition. And, um, Redmond….it’s still not too late to do the same sort of thing with Windows.